20 November 1916

Herr Gottlieb von Jagow c1915. Image courtesy Library of Congress.

Herr Gottlieb von Jagow c1915. Image courtesy Library of Congress.

Will some kind person adopt a motherless baby girl?
Father killed in France?”
Are you list’ning, O, Heavyheart, childless and lone?
Are you reading this message aright?
Is your soul of souls touched by its pitiful tone.
Does it waken a conscience contrite?
Won’t somebody keep, won’t someone adopt
This wee helpless waif of the War,
This dear bud of Heaven on stony soil dropt.
This jetsam on somebody’s shore?
The story is simple, it’s carved on no cairn,
Yet each syllable rings with romance.
who’s going to care for a wee bonny bairn
Whose father died fighting in France?

There are marriage ties merely of parchment and ink
There are bosoms of animate clay;
There are aching hearts drifting for want of a link
To bind them for ever and aye.
There are mansions untrod by the feet of a child,
Uncheered by its sunshine and song:
There are natures ne’er yet by a baby beguiled
Into banishing rancour and wrong.
There are bosoms a-weary of silence and slight,
There are arms that are waiting a chance
To gather within them a poor orphaned mite
Whose father fell fighting in France.

Be sure that the babe of a father who died
For the land that had given him love,
Will thrill with a patriot’s ‘herited pride
Now the eagle gives way to the dove.
Be sure that the courage that coursed in his veins
In that land far away —o’er the wave,
Didn’t cease when his soul shuddered out of its chains
To be with the battle—gods brave,
Be sure that the child of a warrior who
Made one of that mighty Advance,
Will equal in loyalty, trusty and true.
Her sire who fell fighting in France.

Grow up, little girly, grow up and be glad,
Face the footpaths of Fate unafraid.
There may be no mummy, there may be no dad,
where your manners are moulded and made
No mother may hear and no mother may know
Your sweet baby prattle and play;
No father may guide, tho the years come and go.
The footsteps that falter and stray.
But you shall look back through the vista of time
With a patriot’s pride in your glance,
To the day of a sacrifice, great and sublime,
When your father fell fighting in France.

Comments Off on 20 November 1916

19 November 1916

Russian infantry entering Monastir on 19 November 1916. Image courtesy www.whereismacedonia.org

Russian infantry entering Monastir on 19 November 1916. Image courtesy www.whereismacedonia.org

Comments Off on 19 November 1916

18 November 1916

The ruined village of Beaumont Hamel at the end of the Battle of the Somme, Ernest Brooks, November 1916. Image courtesy Imperial War Museum © IWM (Q 1546A).

The ruined village of Beaumont Hamel at the end of the Battle of the Somme, Ernest Brooks, November 1916. Image courtesy Imperial War Museum © IWM (Q 1546A).

 

Comments Off on 18 November 1916

17 November 1916

Comments Off on 17 November 1916

16 November 1916

nzef

Comments Off on 16 November 1916

Raymond Sylvester Lord

Raymond Sylvester Lord was born in 1890 in Cargo, a son of Edward and Alice Lord. From 1898 to 1904 Raymond his older brother Claude attended school in Cumnock where their father Edward was a Senior Constable. Raymond later attended the Patrician Brothers School in Orange.

Raymond was working as a clerk in Wallerawang when he enlisted at Liverpool on 16 February 1915. He was 25 years old, and listed his father Edward Lord, of Parkes, as next of kin. He embarked from Sydney on HMAT Ceramic A40 on 25 June 1915 with the 18th Battalion.

The 18th Battalion trained in Egypt and landed at Anzac Cove on 22 August 1915. Private Raymond Lord was wounded in action on that day, hit by a sniper while he was in a lying position, with the bullet hitting his left hip and grazing his right hip. He was transferred to Mudros the same day, and then to Malta on 27 August 1915. On 13 September 1915 he was transferred to England on Hospital Ship (HS) Panama and admitted to the 3rd London General Hospital at Wandsworth.

Private Lord recovered from his injuries and reported to his unit at Tel-el-Kebir, Egypt, on 13 January 1916. The 18th Battalion joined the British Expeditionary Force and embarked from Alexandria on 18 March 1916, disembarking at Marseilles on 25 March. On 24 June 1916, he was AWL for 35 hours and received 168 hours Field Punishment No 2.

The 18th Battalion took part in its first major battle at Pozieres between 25 July and 5 August 1916. Private Lord was wounded again on 4 August, with gunshot wounds to his left hand. He was admitted to a Casualty Clearing Station on 5 August and then transferred by train to No 8 General Hospital, Rouen, on 6 August. On 24 August he marched into the Australian Divisional Base Depot at Etaples, France. The battalion returned to the Pozieres trenches for a second time in late August. After a spell in a quieter sector of the front in Belgium, the 2nd Division, including the 5th Brigade, moved south again in October.

On 7 November 1916 the 18th Battalion was stationed near Ribemont, a small town located in the French region of Picardie. The Battalion diary for 7 November states:

Trenches in fearful condition. Mud everywhere and knee keep in trenches. Men suffering badly from wet and cold…
Snipers were very active and shelling fairly heavy, particularly along Turk Lane and sunken road. Raining practically all day.

Private Raymond Lord died from multiple shell wounds received in action on 15 November 1916, aged 26 years, at the 4th Australian Field Ambulance, France. He was buried at Bernafay Wood British Cemetery, Montauban, France. His father later received his 1914-15 Star Medal, British War Medal and Victory Medal.

At the time of his death, Raymond’s brother, 395 Sergeant Claude Lord – 4th Infantry Battalion, was serving in Belgium with the Anzac Provost Police Corps. Raymond’s elder brother, 4700 Private Roy Lord – 18th Battalion, had enlisted on 1 January 1916 and was awarded the Military Medal for assisting in saving wounded men under heavy fire on 9 August 1918 near Rainecourt, France. Private Roy Lord survived the war and returned to Australia on 5 April 1919. Claude returned to Australia in December 1918.

Raymond Sylvester Lord is commemorated on the Cumnock Public School WWI Honour Board, the World War I Roll of Honour on the southern face of the Orange Cenotaph and on panel number 86 on the Roll of Honour at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra.

In July 1917 a tree was planted at Orange Public School in Raymond’s memory. It was one of 26 trees planted in honour of fallen soldiers who had attended the school.

In 1923 the Anzac Memorial Avenue of trees was planted along Bathurst Road to commemorate fallen WWI soldiers. A tree was planted in honour of “Pte RS Lord”; it was donated by Orange High School. Very few of the trees are still standing today.

* Dianne Strahan and Val McKenzie, April 2015
Cumnock NSW War Memorials

Comments Off on Raymond Sylvester Lord

15 November 1916

Comments Off on 15 November 1916

14 November 1916

Comments Off on 14 November 1916

13 November 1916

Bombs, steel helmets and other stores left behind by German troops driven out of St Pierre Divion, John Warwick Brooke, 13 November 1916. Image courtesy Imperial War Museum © IWM (Q 4586).

Bombs, steel helmets and other stores left behind by German troops driven out of St Pierre Divion, John Warwick Brooke, 13 November 1916. Image courtesy Imperial War Museum © IWM (Q 4586).

How I wish, more than I can ever tell, that I were back in dear sunny NSW, with my wife, and children in our dear little quiet home.

Comments Off on 13 November 1916

12 November 1916

Camouflaged gun and positions, near Sailly-Saillisel, Peronne-Bapaume Road in rear, September 1916. Image courtesy Imperial War Museum © IWM (Q 42232).

Camouflaged gun and positions, near Sailly-Saillisel, Peronne-Bapaume Road in rear, September 1916. Image courtesy Imperial War Museum © IWM (Q 42232).

Comments Off on 12 November 1916