30 April 1915

Some days ago the Australian War Expeditionary Forces were transferred from Egypt to the Dardanelles. They have since landed, and have been in action on the Gallipoli Peninsula. News reaches us that the action is proceeding satisfactorily.

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29 April 1915

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28 April 1915

Map of the Helles war zone of Gallipoli, 1915. Image courtesy Rcbutcher, Wikimedia Commons.

Map of the Helles war zone of Gallipoli, 1915.
Image courtesy Rcbutcher, Wikimedia Commons.

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27 April 1915

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26 April 1915

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25 April 1915

Members of No. 2 Field Company, Royal Australian Engineers, land on the beach at Gallipoli, 6.30am 25 April 1915, Cyril Oscar Lawrence.  Image courtesy Australian War Memorial.

Members of No. 2 Field Company, Royal Australian Engineers, land on the beach at Gallipoli, 6.30am 25 April 1915, Cyril Oscar Lawrence.
Image courtesy Australian War Memorial.

747 Australians die on the first day, including Eric Martin Solling and Herbert Maurice Robertshaw from Orange. During the first nine days at Gallipoli the ANZACs suffer almost 8,000 casualties, with 2,300 dead.

Total Australian casualties at the end of the Gallipoli campaign are: 7,823 killed, 19,441 wounded, 569 dead from disease and 31 dead due to accidents. It is estimated that about 70 men from Orange served at Gallipoli; 29 of them failed to return.

25th April was officially named Anzac Day in 1916.

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Herbert Maurice Robertshaw

Herbert Maurice Robertshaw at Broadmeadows army camp, Victoria, October 1914. Image courtesy Australian War Memorial.

Herbert Maurice Robertshaw at Broadmeadows army camp, Victoria, October 1914.
Image courtesy Australian War Memorial.

Herbert Maurice Robertshaw was born in Orange in 1887, the second son and fifth child of Henry Robertshaw and his wife Jeanie. By the turn of the century the family had relocated to Melbourne, where Herbert attended Moreland Primary School. In 1901 the Education Department awarded Herbert a scholarship to attend Brunswick College, and it was there, in 1906, that he passed his matriculation examination. In 1908 he completed his second year of a Bachelor of Arts degree and was awarded honours in Mental and Moral Philosophy.

The terms of Herbert’s scholarship stipulated that he proceed to the Ministry of the Presbyterian Church of Victoria; by January 1914 he was the Reverend at Northcote Presbyterian Church.

Reverend Robertshaw was one of the first men born in Orange to enlist in WWI, doing so in Melbourne on 17 August 1914, just a week after voluntary recruitment commenced.

Herbert was given the rank of Corporal and assigned to the 6th Infantry Battalion. He embarked from Melbourne in October 1914 and joined the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force in Alexandria in early April 1915.

Corporal Robertshaw was part of the second wave to land at Gallipoli on 25 April 1915. According to a fellow soldier Robertshaw hit the sands at Anzac Cove and advanced about two miles inland before becoming separated from his comrades. He was initially reported as missing in action however the proceedings of a Court of Enquiry held at Erquinghem in France on 24 April 1916 pronounced him to have been killed in action on 25 April 1915.

Two men from Orange lost their lives that fateful day: Robertshaw and Eric Martin Solling. Charles Herbert Cane was killed in action just two days later on 27 April. These three men were the first people from Orange to die in WWI.

Herbert Maurice Robertshaw is commemorated on the Lone Pine Memorial, Gallipoli, Turkey with others who have no known grave.

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24 April 1915

 The grand parade of Australian troops pass the Mitchell Library and the Royal Botanic Gardens in Sydney, 24 April 1915, Samuel J Hood Studio, ANMM Collection. Image courtesy Australian National Maritime Museum.


The grand parade of Australian troops pass the Mitchell Library and the Royal Botanic Gardens in Sydney, 24 April 1915, Samuel J Hood Studio.
Image courtesy Australian National Maritime Museum.

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23 April 1915

Australian Navy submarine AE2. Image courtesy Australian War Memorial.

Australian Navy submarine AE2.
Image courtesy Australian War Memorial.

The Soldier by Rupert Brooke

If I should die, think only this of me:
That there’s some corner of a foreign field
That is for ever England. There shall be
In that rich earth a richer dust concealed;
A dust whom England bore, shaped, made aware,
Gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways to roam,
A body of England’s, breathing English air,
Washed by the rivers, blest by suns of home.

And think, this heart, all evil shed away,
A pulse in the eternal mind, no less
Gives somewhere back the thoughts by England given;
Her sights and sounds; dreams happy as her day;
And laughter, learnt of friends; and gentleness,
In hearts at peace, under an English heaven.

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22 April 1915

Imperial Germany Embassy advertisement, Des Moines Register, 22 April 1915.

Imperial Germany Embassy advertisement, Des Moines Register, 22 April 1915.

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